The Ohio State University at Newark


Ohio State Newark Professor to Discuss Bees in the Corn-Soy Landscapes of the Midwest

February 17, 2021

Agriculture relies on bee pollinators for about 1/3 of crop production. In the Midwest, non-pollinator dependent crops like corn and soybean dominate agricultural landscapes, but many specialty crops do rely on pollinators.

Karen Goodell, PhD, professor of evolution, ecology and organismal biology at The Ohio State University at Newark, will discuss the risks and benefits of corn-soy agriculture for native bees in the Midwest during an upcoming Faculty Talks Outside the Box. The talk will be virtual on Tuesday, March 16 at 4 p.m. via Zoom.

She will also talk more broadly about her research to assess the status of Ohio’s native bees.

Goodell is a sought-after expert who has sent a bee to space and whose research has been funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Columbus Zoo. Recently published work from her lab funded by the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) documents the abundance and habitat associations of Ohio’s bumblebees and will help ODOT avoid harming at-risk bumblebee populations when planning transportation projects. Read more about her here.

Register at go.osu.edu/nwkfacultytalksmarch2021.

If you require an accommodation to participate fully, please contact Connie Zang at zang.3@osu.edu. Requests should be made as soon as possible but no later than March 2. Requests will be accepted beyond that date and every effort to provide a needed accommodation will be made.

During Faculty Talks Outside the Box, Ohio State Newark professors discuss recent research in their fields as it relates to our community and answer questions. All talks are free and open to the public.

The Ohio State University at Newark offers an academic environment that is inclusive of diversity, challenging but supportive with world-renowned professors and access to Ohio State’s more than 200 majors. It’s where learning comes to life. Research, study abroad and service-learning opportunities prepare students for their careers in ways they never expected.